A New Indigenous Order: My Thoughts on the Chaos of the U.S Election and Trump Aftermath.

I felt slightly sick when I heard Trump would be the next American president.

I have deliberately over the last 12 months tried to make no mention of the circus known as the American Election because I didn’t want to give air to it, didn’t want to give one single breath to the situation, didn’t want one ounce of my life force to contribute to it.

For me, it was a mixture of sadness and disappointment that a society had allowed for such ugliness to get that far. So I looked on mostly in silence and watched as the whole thing went down, and down it went…

down,

down,

down.

I am part of many groups of indigenous academics, Maori development trusts and globally vision focused projects and initiatives, all who work incredibly hard to fight for empowerment, equality and freedom of the marginalised, the oppressed and the vulnerable and while this can be very heavy work, we, for the most part feel optimistic about the future and people in general. We believe in our work, and believe we have an impact. We work from a position that believes people are inherently good and when a country votes in a person who has openly expressed values of misogyny, xenophobia, homophobia and racism – all the things we fight against on a daily basis, it starts to rock the foundations of those beliefs. Everything we have been told to stand up for and fight against, has been given a swift slap in the face by America voting in Trump. What the hell is going on? As a sane and ‘orderly’ person, you start to question your beliefs about the world you think you live in – you start to lose your sense of order and chaos is created.

Currently, with the huge sense of unrest and confusion, the U.S is likely to experience a time of economic turmoil and instability. Therefore, now is the time that Indigenous nations should look to fortify by forming connections that can help each other grow economically. We should encourage and develop trade relations with each other to build, create and develop a robust and vibrant united indigenous economy. To achieve this, it is imperative that we develop more cross-communications with each other, more connection platforms across tribal nations and to open up more networks into each other’s indigenous communities. We need a deeper understanding of each other’s assets, resources and capabilities so that we can identify opportunities and future possibilities to take advantage of and to further each other’s agendas.

As indigenous people, most of us come from chaotic colonial histories. We have been through and seen far worse. We know how to fight. We know resilience. We know survival. It was the philosopher Neitzche that said ‘out of chaos comes order’, which essentially means that in chaos people try to find order and I challenge us to find that opportunity and create our own Indigenous Order.

3 thoughts on “A New Indigenous Order: My Thoughts on the Chaos of the U.S Election and Trump Aftermath.

  1. As a Maori, I understand your comments expressed. However, there is one key question to be asked. Are the things you hear, see and even feel coming from the US valid. From your perspective you say yes, because of what you heard and observed and clearly validated by the consensus of opinions coming out of the US. From the press, current government, the political pundits and the rhetoric between the parties and so on. Yet, Trump won! How could that have happened? Have the American people lost so much where they have become a degenerate people with no value in its humanity, as to elect such a vile man as their president?

    The answer can be found first in America’s rich history from its founding, it’s Constitution Document and the fact that America is not a democracy but a Republic, preserving individual freedoms and that all men (and women) are created equal in the exercise of that freedom. Trump ran as a non-politician beating 16 well qualified politicians in the primaries, thus winning the right to run against Hillary Clinton, the former first lady and consummate politician. “A shoe in”. A point to make, she has a well established history of corruption that plagued her candidacy that included the supporting system of people and organizations, including the press core.

    The stunning fact is, his win was a profound repudiation of the current party in power, that every Democratic operative at every level including the pollsters completely missed. All the polls and stats indicated a win for Clinton. As the polls closed, it became evident that he would not only win, but by resounding numbers in those areas that were historically Democratic.

    Interesting, it was a backlash from those who felt their voices were not being heard, including Democrats. While we all found his speech repugnant, his message and ability to lead and address serious economic issues for the majority whose income has not risen in 8 to 10 years, was seen as the more important issue. An example of this initial impact is the results in the stock market, rising off the charts in response to his candidacy, that will also have a positive impact for New Zealand. Obviously, there is much more that I can add, but my purpose was to provide context.

    Whaanga Kewene

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  2. “President” Trump is an insult to the position he is in. His first 6 weeks in office has demonstrated complete disregard for the office and for the people whom he represents. This President has proven an embarrassment to the United States.

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